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Portable Sawmill Service Load-Out

portable sawmill primal woods

Preparing For Portable Sawmill Service Work

The key word here, is portable.  Which is to say, you are some distance from the usual support systems of a typical stationary sawmill.  You may not have access to your full suite of tools; on weekends technical support from the manufacturer of your portable sawmill may or may not be available.  And as the Sawyer time is not on your side.  Downtime is the enemy, and everything must be done to prevent it, and respond to it if Murphy shows up.  So, what exactly does that entail? Read more

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Epic Day Milling Black Walnut

Portable Sawmill Service Challenges and Rewards

portable sawmill service

The Challenges | Portable Sawmill Service

Fortunately, the challenges at the start of this portable sawmill service work were surmountable, and were surmounted.  As well, these lows led to the resulting high of this great day in La Porte, Indiana, with the Janas family. Read more

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What’s Coming from Primal Woods – Subscription Box

Primal Woods Life Subscription Box

Concept: Primal Woods Life Subscription Box

So, what’s with the subcription box?  Just another marketing gimmick?  If selling what we are up to, what we make, the services we provide, and how we are choosing to live, is a marketing gimmick, then I stand guilty as charged.  I’ll be as authentic as I can. The listing of the reasons, albeit incomplete, will be in no particular order.  “The Box” as I have come to call it, will be sold from our Shop, and at least in my own mind, will provide:

For Our Customers, and Our Community:

  • A “curated” (like we run a museum or an art gallery or something, ha!) box of goodies, hand-picked by us, or of our own making,  but regardless, consumed by us.
  • Access to subscriber-only Blog posts (more on this later).
  • The opportunity to support Our Purpose, which is why we are here after all.
  • Direct access to the suppliers of products or services included in “the Box.”
  • An opportunity to join us, on this mother-of-all-journeys that we are on.
 Our Purpose | Primal Woods

Value – Health – Generosity, In Person – In Community – In Life’s Work

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Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Test Run

Testing the Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch

Let me just say this about that!  The winch attachment to the Alaskan chainsaw mill works great; I don’t know how I have managed without it.  It eliminates much of the strenuous physical labor otherwise required.  The quality of the cuts is improved, as is productivity.

Alaskan chainsaw mill winch attachment

Winch attachment to Alaskan chainsaw mill complete

Lessons Learned – Alaskan Chainsaw Mill and Winch

  • Fifty ft of rope is probably more than needed 99% of the time, that is enough for a log close to 25 feet long; we took about 16 feet off during the test to make more room on the winch spool.
  • The rope is either routed over or under the handle of the Granberg, in the run between the pulley and the winch; under the handle seemed to work best, but this may be an opportunity for incremental improvement.
  • Nails are sufficient for anchoring the pulley to the end of the log.
  • The first 6 inches into the log, and the last 12 inches or so, are cut without the aid of the winch.
  • Keep the attachment points for the winch, and carabiner at the end of the rope, as low as possible on the Granberg MkIII Chainsaw Milling Attachment; “racking” the mill, which is to say, tipping the mill towards the far end of the log, can occur, causing the chain to cut deeper into the log.  In deeper cuts, where the “thickness rails” are far above the bar, pay particularly close attention to this possibility.
  • As the log narrows, and/or as mill closes on the pulley, the carabiner attachment point will likely need to be moved towards the center of the log, to maintain roughly equal tension on the ends of the bar nearest and furthest from the powerhead.
  • When Alaskan chainsaw milling, bring plenty of gas/oil mix, and plenty of bar and chain oil; in a 30 inch diamter, 8 foot log, both tanks on the powerhead were close to empty at the end of each cut.
  • And this is a lesson you do not want to learn the hard way; wear appropriate safety gear, including hearing and eye protection, gloves, and chainsaw chaps.

See the Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Test

If you have not already, check out our post on adding the winch, Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Attachment.  If you are thinking about engaging the services of a sawyer, check out our related post, How to Find and Work With a Local Sawmill Service. And don’t forget to check out our Sawyers page, for related blog posts and YouTube videos.

All the best, and kind regards,

John

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Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Attachment

Installing a Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch: Step-by-Step

Alaskan chainsaw mill

Granberg MkIII Alaskan Chainsaw Milling Attachment with Husqvarna 3120xp Powerhead

Why Install a Winch on Your Alaskan Chainsaw Mill?

Controlling and moving the chainsaw mill, in a 30-40 inch diameter log, over the course of several feet, takes effort, a lot of effort.  The powerhead is an 8.31 hp Husqvarna 3120xp; the largest and most powerful powerhead that Husqvarna makes, and one of the most powerful in the world.  In operation, it wants to pull the powerhead into the log, very forcefully.  The powerhead weighs in at 22.9 lbs.  Attached to that is the Cannon Sawmiller double-ended 56 inch bar, which itself is considerably hefty, probably a good deal heavier than the powerhead.  It takes manhandling to move this assembly through the log, not accounting for the weight of the Granberg MkIII 48 Inch Milling Attachment, Helper Handle with Roller, Chain Tensioner, and Auxiliary Oiler.  All of the manhandling necessary can negatively effect the quality of the cuts, and productivity.  Hence, we are adding a winch and other necessary components to the Alaskan chainsaw mill.  The winch will provide some much-needed, and frankly, much-appreciated, mechanical advantage applied to pulling the mill through the log.  Read on for the details. Read more

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How to Find and Work With a Local Sawmill Service

Using a Local Sawmill Service: How-To

Sawmill Service Primary Equipment: Wood-Mizer LT40-HDG35

Sawmill Service Primary Equipment: Wood-Mizer LT40-HDG35

Finding and Contacting a Sawmill Service Provider

I ask every customer the simple question, “how did you find our sawmill service?”  A majority of the time, the customer has started with an on-line search.  Take your pick, Google, Bing, Yahoo!, etc.  Next up on the hit parade, referrals from past customers.  Reach out, either on-line, or to your friends and neighbors, or both.  There are industry websites that might also prove useful in your search; Wood-Mizer’s Find a Local Sawyer, and portablesawmill.info are two such sites. Read more

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The Quarter-Sawing Process, and Problems, Oh No!

The best image found representing the process being documented. “Steps taken to quarter saw a log, a quarter sawn log and a quarter sawn board (clockwise from top left).” Image attribution: https://www.domain.com.au/news/diy-working-with-timber-at-home-20120322-1vllr/

The first step towards improving any process, is to understand the current state of the process, and in my opinion formally documenting that process in words and pictures is a solid foundation for improvement efforts.  It’s important to keep in mind that this process is not the “be all and end all” just because it is documented; it is though the process currently in use. Read more

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Forest Products: Hard Maple Flooring

American hophornbeam for fencing

I have posted on more than one occasion, regarding the felling of trees, bucking and splitting to produce wood fuel, and chipping to produce mulch.  There is also American hophornbeam (aka ironwood, see under “Trees” on the Plants & Animals page) growing on the homestead, which makes great fence posts; I have perhaps 15 to 20 such posts air drying now.  Hophornbeam can also be used to make long bows and re-curve bows, which I intend to attempt in the future.  Of course maple syrup is another  forest product, and one we intend to expand our production of in the spring of 2015.  And the list goes on.

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