, , ,

Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Test Run

Testing the Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch

Let me just say this about that!  The winch attachment to the Alaskan chainsaw mill works great; I don’t know how I have managed without it.  It eliminates much of the strenuous physical labor otherwise required.  The quality of the cuts is improved, as is productivity.

Alaskan chainsaw mill winch attachment

Winch attachment to Alaskan chainsaw mill complete

Lessons Learned – Alaskan Chainsaw Mill and Winch

  • Fifty ft of rope is probably more than needed 99% of the time, that is enough for a log close to 25 feet long; we took about 16 feet off during the test to make more room on the winch spool.
  • The rope is either routed over or under the handle of the Granberg, in the run between the pulley and the winch; under the handle seemed to work best, but this may be an opportunity for incremental improvement.
  • Nails are sufficient for anchoring the pulley to the end of the log.
  • The first 6 inches into the log, and the last 12 inches or so, are cut without the aid of the winch.
  • Keep the attachment points for the winch, and carabiner at the end of the rope, as low as possible on the Granberg MkIII Chainsaw Milling Attachment; “racking” the mill, which is to say, tipping the mill towards the far end of the log, can occur, causing the chain to cut deeper into the log.  In deeper cuts, where the “thickness rails” are far above the bar, pay particularly close attention to this possibility.
  • As the log narrows, and/or as mill closes on the pulley, the carabiner attachment point will likely need to be moved towards the center of the log, to maintain roughly equal tension on the ends of the bar nearest and furthest from the powerhead.
  • When Alaskan chainsaw milling, bring plenty of gas/oil mix, and plenty of bar and chain oil; in a 30 inch diamter, 8 foot log, both tanks on the powerhead were close to empty at the end of each cut.
  • And this is a lesson you do not want to learn the hard way; wear appropriate safety gear, including hearing and eye protection, gloves, and chainsaw chaps.

See the Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Test

If you have not already, check out our post on adding the winch, Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Attachment.  If you are thinking about engaging the services of a sawyer, check out our related post, How to Find and Work With a Local Sawmill Service. And don’t forget to check out our Sawyers page, for related blog posts and YouTube videos.

All the best, and kind regards,

John

Like and Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/primalwoods
Watch our videos on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/primalwoods
See our posts on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/primal_woods/

, , ,

Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch Attachment

Installing a Alaskan Chainsaw Mill Winch: Step-by-Step

Alaskan chainsaw mill

Granberg MkIII Alaskan Chainsaw Milling Attachment with Husqvarna 3120xp Powerhead

Why Install a Winch on Your Alaskan Chainsaw Mill?

Controlling and moving the chainsaw mill, in a 30-40 inch diameter log, over the course of several feet, takes effort, a lot of effort.  The powerhead is an 8.31 hp Husqvarna 3120xp; the largest and most powerful powerhead that Husqvarna makes, and one of the most powerful in the world.  In operation, it wants to pull the powerhead into the log, very forcefully.  The powerhead weighs in at 22.9 lbs.  Attached to that is the Cannon Sawmiller double-ended 56 inch bar, which itself is considerably hefty, probably a good deal heavier than the powerhead.  It takes manhandling to move this assembly through the log, not accounting for the weight of the Granberg MkIII 48 Inch Milling Attachment, Helper Handle with Roller, Chain Tensioner, and Auxiliary Oiler.  All of the manhandling necessary can negatively effect the quality of the cuts, and productivity.  Hence, we are adding a winch and other necessary components to the Alaskan chainsaw mill.  The winch will provide some much-needed, and frankly, much-appreciated, mechanical advantage applied to pulling the mill through the log.  Read on for the details. Read more

, , , ,

Raw Honey – Natural Beekeeping: 2017 Season Update

A Brief History of Our Beekeeping Experience

With a vision of making raw honey for our own consumption, we began beekeeping in the spring of 2014; so far, it has been the proverbial “tough row to hoe.”

raw honey definition

The Warré hive type was chosen, a top bar hive, without the frames and foundation typical of the Langstroth hive.  The Warré is a hive used in natural beekeeping circles, and that’s where we wanted to be.  It has its advantages and disadvantages to be sure.  An advantage is that the hives are relatively easy and inexpensive to build.  This was detailed in two earlier posts, WARRÉ BEE HIVE CONSTRUCTION – PART I and WARRÉ BEE HIVE CONSTRUCTION – PART II.  I have only made three modications in contravention of Warré’s original design.  In the spring of 2016 I ventilated the “quilts” with two 1 inch holes.  And, this spring, I modified my hive floors to include a screened bottom board, and  raised the hives from the ground about 18 inches.

The first year installation of new bee packages did not go so well, and feeding the new colonies also did not go well.  Frankly, I made of mess of things.  You can read all about it in a post I made that spring of 2014, LATE SPRING UPDATE FROM THE HOMESTEAD, PART I.  You can find all of our posts regarding the making of local honey and beekeeping here.  Since that first spring we have made improvement to the process and equipment year by year, and this spring we harvested our first raw honey, put up by the bees in 2016. Read more

, , , ,

How to Find and Work With a Local Sawmill Service

Using a Local Sawmill Service: How-To

Sawmill Service Primary Equipment: Wood-Mizer LT40-HDG35

Sawmill Service Primary Equipment: Wood-Mizer LT40-HDG35

Finding and Contacting a Sawmill Service Provider

I ask every customer the simple question, “how did you find our sawmill service?”  A majority of the time, the customer has started with an on-line search.  Take your pick, Google, Bing, Yahoo!, etc.  Next up on the hit parade, referrals from past customers.  Reach out, either on-line, or to your friends and neighbors, or both.  There are industry websites that might also prove useful in your search; Wood-Mizer’s Find a Local Sawyer, and portablesawmill.info are two such sites. Read more

, , , ,

Peach Trees – Actions against Peach Tree Borer

A brief update on 3 of the fruit trees, the peaches, planted in June of 2016.  The details of all of the fruit and nut trees and shrubs can be found in the blog post “FRUIT & NUT TREE AND SHRUB WALK-AROUND JULY 2016.”  It’s safe to say I have provided all of the trees and shrubs planted with near-zero support.  So far we have only lost one peach, the “Flamin’ Fury,” and that was last year; it did not look good from the git go.

Yesterday I was prompted to check the remaining peaches for peach borer by my friend PJ.  ‘Shor ‘nuf, they appear to have recently been at the O’Henry Peach, and perhaps less recently, and less aggressively, at the  Loring Peach. Read more

, , , , , ,

Planning for 2018 Maple Syrup Expansion

Improvements will be built upon the foundation of the current process, as defined in the “Process Flow-Maple Syrup” diagram

It is is mid-June, and already I feel a bit late in putting together the improvements necessary to significantly scale up maple operations in 2018. This is my first pass at identifying what needs to be put in place to increase production by a factor of 8x to 10x. The number of taps will go from 50-70 in 2017, to 400-500 in 2018.  What will stay the same, and what will change? Read more

, , , , ,

Paleo f(x) 2017 #pfx17 Recap – 4 Recommendations for Radically Improving Health

Clockwise from Upper Left: Michelle and Keith Norris, Geri & John in the #pfx17 afterglow, Robb Wolf, Dr. Josh Axe, Abel James and family, Abel James

Geri and I made the trip to one of our favorite towns, Austin, TX, for Paleo f(x) 2017. It was worth every penny.  And as I began to put this post together, a now-familiar problem came to the fore, that being an inability to separate “Paleo,” as it relates to our diet, and more, from our lives in general, and from Primal Woods in particular. By the way, I am using the word “diet” as defined, “the kinds of food that a person, animal, or community habitually eats.” That is to say, not as some temporary aberration, defined as, “a departure from what is normal, usual, or expected, typically one that is unwelcome.” In other words, our diet is not a weight loss plan, it is part of our lifestyle. So, I will be sharing our experience at #pfx17 in the larger context of what we are up to at Primal Woods, and in our lives.
Read more

, , , , , , , ,

The Quarter-Sawing Process, and Problems, Oh No!

The best image found representing the process being documented. “Steps taken to quarter saw a log, a quarter sawn log and a quarter sawn board (clockwise from top left).” Image attribution: https://www.domain.com.au/news/diy-working-with-timber-at-home-20120322-1vllr/

The first step towards improving any process, is to understand the current state of the process, and in my opinion formally documenting that process in words and pictures is a solid foundation for improvement efforts.  It’s important to keep in mind that this process is not the “be all and end all” just because it is documented; it is though the process currently in use. Read more

, , , ,

Revisiting the End of Maple Sugaring Season – Based on Growing Degree Days

Sugar Maple buds, iPhonography through telescope 2017 Apr 04

Of course our maple season ended some time ago, the last sap was evaporated on March 21st; the end having nothing to do with Growing Degree Days and reaching budbreak, but having everything to do with the trees healing the tap holes to the extent that sap flow was stifled. As I looked out the window yesterday though, it was clear that the two mature Red Maples in our backyard were in the process of leafing out, and with the naked eye it looked like the Sugar Maples on the south side of the house were budding out, if not yet flowering or leafing out. Read more

, , , ,

Predicting the End of Maple Sugaring Season – Caveat emptor

Back to the Growing Degree Days (GDD) calculation, and “knowing” that Sugar Maples budbreak between 30-50 GDD°C base 10 (54-100 GDD°F base 50), how then does that help us?  Even predicting the end of the season is of dubious value I suppose, but it seems like a good exercise.  So, I’m just taking a relatively uninformed shot at this prediction; I have not tested the results against “real life” as recorded in prior years, nor have I used records from real life in prior years to inform this prediction.  In other words, caveat emptor. Read more